News and Events

Rumay Alexander on the cover of Nurse Leader

June 8, 2012 | In Faculty, News, SON Media Coverage

Rumay-vertical Dr. Rumay Alexander

An interview with Dr. Rumay Alexander, Clinical Professor and director of the School of Nursing Office of Multicultural Affairs, was the cover story for the June 2012 issue of the Nurse Leader journal.

In the article, Dr. Alexander recounts lessons she learned from being a church choir director when she was only 12 years old and what led her to be a nurse. She also shares her definition of diversity: holding multiple perspectives without judgment. Read the complete interview here: http://www.nurseleader.com/article/S1541-4612(12)00092-4/fulltext.

"Dr. Alexander’s efforts towards enhancing acceptance, civility, and inclusiveness in the academy, health care, and society is a commitment without end," said Dr. Kristen M. Swanson, Dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor. "So long as there are differences amongst people, ideas, opportunities, and resources there will be reasons for individual, institutional, and global discernment about courses of action that lead to the greater good. In the School of Nursing, Dr. Alexander is an invaluable contributor to our daily efforts to assure that past, current, and future faculty, staff, and students feel welcome in the School of Nursing."

Nurse Leader is the official bimonthly journal of the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), the national organization of nurses who design, facilitate and manage care. The journal provides the vision, skills, and tools needed by nurses currently in, or aspiring to, leadership positions.


Tar Heel of the Week Meg Zomorodi is Dedicated to Improving End-of-Life Care

December 5, 2011 | In Faculty, News, Research, SON Media Coverage Tags: , , , ,

Zomorodi_web Dr. Zomorodi

Meg Zomorodi’s mother prepped her to be a nurse from a young age – sharing the gory details of her own days in the emergency room and teaching her the nuts and bolts of the human body.

But it was her mother’s sudden death early in Zomorodi’s nursing career that did the most to shape her future path. Zomorodi emerged from the traumatic experience eager to improve the way nurses help critically ill patients and their families.

"She even taught me in her death how I could be a better nurse," Zomorodi says. "I think of her in everything I do."

Zomorodi has centered her career on improving end-of-life care – as a nurse, researcher and teacher. She trains future nurses as a professor at UNC-Chapel Hill, where she also helped establish a scholarship in her mother’s name. More recently, she has led an initiative there to carve out new roles for nurses meant to improve patient care.

Read rest of the story here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/12/04/1688009/meg-zomorodi-nurse-researcher.html#storylink=misearch#ixzz1ffXhJ2R9