Mission

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Our Mission is to facilitate and support gerontological/geriatric nursing research, education, practice and service consistent with the mission of the School of Nursing.

Major Methods:

  • Dissemination of information on gerontological/geriatric nursing research, education, practice and service to each other and our colleagues in the School of Nursing, University, and community.
  • Provide networking opportunities for research, education, practice and service to our students, faculty members, affiliates, and colleagues in other units within the University and outside the University.
  • Link gerontological/geriatric nursing research and information with policy makers, practitioners, and other educators.
  • Advocate for increased emphasis on gerontological/geriatric nursing research, education, and practice within the School of Nursing, University and community.
  • Promote gerontological/geriatric nursing career development and advancement of our students and faculty colleagues.

Perspectives on Aging

“It has been estimated that as of January 1, 2006, every 7 seconds, for the next 19 years, a baby boomer will turn 60 years old1. This trend will impact the U.S. population by increasing the total aging population to 20% by the year 2030; as of 2003 it was just over 12%2. The increase in the number of older adults will impact individuals, families, communities, service providers, public policy, and society.”

Author: Jennifer Lambert-Shute
Article Title: Aging issues: unanswered questions in marital and family therapy literature.
Journal: Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, January 2011, 37(1), 27-36.

According to the report from North Carolina Commission on Aging in 20113, about 18.8% of older adults in NC are minorities. North Carolina has a significantly higher percentage of black elderly (15.6%) than the overall U.S. (8.4%). In contrast, North Carolina has a lower percentage of Hispanic elderly (1.2%) than the overall U.S. (6.5%).

  1. Van Riper, T. (2005). How to play: The upcoming baby boom. Retrieved February 13, 2006.
  2. Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. (2004). Older Americans 2004: Key Indicators of wellbeing. Federal interagency forum on aging-related statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
  3. North Carolina Commission on Aging (2011).