MSN Student Katie Shattuck Wins Competitive Carolina Institute of Developmental Disabilities Award

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August 25, 2010 | In Faculty, Research Tags: , , , ,
 

Katherine (Katie) Shattuck, BSN, RN, is a second year graduate student working toward a Master of Science Degree in Nursing to become a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner. Katie began her graduate program with over four years of clinical experience in the Newborn Critical Care Center at the NC Children’s Hospital where she had advanced to responsibility for teaching new nurses the intricacies of caring for extremely ill newborns.

Through her clinical practice and her initial year of graduate study, Katie has developed a strong interest in the ongoing needs of children born with developmental disorders and their family’s need to locate and coordinate high quality care in the community.

Katie recently won a competitive interdisciplinary fellowship offered through the Carolina Institute of Developmental Disabilites to learn a great deal more about how to do just that. As a Fellow of the NC LEND program for the 2010-11 academic year, she will have the opportunity to develop skills in the areas of: leadership, education, policy development, system administration, clinical practice, and research in the field of developmental disabilities.

Katie’s potential was further recognized as she was also selected to participate in the advanced interdisciplinary program of the Maternal Child Health Leadership Consortium, a UNC-CH campus-wide program, to assess her leadership style and develop the skills to meet her long-term goals.

Katie’s potential became obvious to the School of Nursing faculty in her courses last year (during which year she also gave birth to her own son). Her clear leadership and academic potential spurred Susan Brunssen, PhD, RN, Nursing Training Director for the NC LEND, to sponsor her application.

She has also been given the opportunity to assist another professor, Maureen Kelly, MSN, cPNP, in the conduct of a clinical research study. Katie mbraces each of these as “great opportunities” and says she is very excited at the prospects for this year. She is already asking the difficult questions that are the hallmark of critical thinkers.