Awards

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The Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award

The Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award is open to any undergraduate or graduate student enrolled at UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing. Students are asked to submit work that analyzes its subject using the lens of race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality and culture, or that focuses on the contributions of women and men of all colors to society, history, culture or thought. All winners will receive a plaque and a monetary award. The Pauline W Brown Diversity Scholarship Award Application (2014).

The 2014 Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award

Ethan Cicero, BSN Class of 2014, is the 2014 recipient of the Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award. Cicero won the award for his work educating UNC School of Nursing Faculty and Staff on Teaching Students to Care for Transgender Patients and Families. In addition, Cicero also held multiple continuing education seminars for UNC Campus Health providers, nurses, and staff on Communicating and Caring for Transgender Patients. Both presentations provided introductory concepts of transgender identities and functional knowledge healthcare members can incorporate into their respective roles. Introducing and illustrating a portrait of transgender identities, terminology, and multiple aspects of societal stigmatization became the foundation of the presentation. Once this groundwork was delivered, the sessions transitioned into educating others on patient-centered, compassionate, safe, and comprehensive care for transgender patients. After graduation, Cicero plans to work as a nurse at UNC Hospital’s Medicine Progressive Care Unit.

View the award winning submission  in PDF format.

Previous Award Winners

nancy_gentry_perkinsThe 2013 Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award

Nancy Gentry Perkins, MSN Class of 2013, is the 2013 recipient of the Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award. Perkins won the award for her paper Childhood Obesity in Rural Latinos: Implications and Interventions for its Assessment, Prevention, and Management. The paper provides a comprehensive review of the interventions and implications for the assessment, prevention and management of childhood obesity in rural Latinos. It also discusses the policy-setting role of clinicians and the cultural implications important to providing the best possible care for the rural Latino pediatric population. Perkins plans to work as a family nurse practitioner in rural North Carolina upon graduation.

View the award winning submission in PDF format.

The 2012 Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award

MSN student, Mary Clay Federspiel, is the 2012 recipients of the Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award. Federspiel’s winning submission was the paper Discussing Sexual Orientation with Adolescents in a Pediatric Primary Care Setting. She wanted to find a way to take what she had learned back to her chosen population.The manuscript explores aspects of the health care encounter that provide opportunities for building trust and rapport with sexual minority youth including the physical environment, provider attitude, confidentiality, and word choice during the medical interview.

View the award winning submission in PDF format

The 2011 Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award

OMA Mary carter photoOMA christine weeks photoAccelerated BSN student Mary Carter and MSN student Christine Weeks are the 2011 recipients of the Pauline W. Brown diversity scholarship award. Carter’s winning submission was the paper “Exile and reintegration among rape survivors in the Democratic Republic of Congo: Factors influencing rejection and acceptance.” She performed a secondary analysis of data to examine the cultural factors that influence whether women that experience rape are then exiled or accepted by their husbands. Weeks won the award with her review paper “Factors influencing self care behaviors of African American adults with type 2 diabetes.” She examined research in which the study population contained at least 15% African Americans and directly addressed factors affecting self care behaviors.

View Mary Carter’s award-winning submission in PDF format.

View Christine Weeks’ award-winning submission in PDF format.

 

2010 Pauline W. Brown Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship

2008 Kindred Spirit Award winner, Caitlyn Mathis Cherie Smith-Miller, RN, BSN, MEd. and Ashley Leak, RN-BC, MSN, OCN, John A. Hartford Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) Scholar, current SON PhD students, received The Pauline W. Brown Diversity Scholarship Award, 2010 (formerly the Kindred Spirits Achievement Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship) for raising awareness of how short term global health experiences foster nurse’s cultural competence in clinical practice.

Smith-Miller and Leak’s project, entitled Leaving the Comfort of the Familiar: Fostering Workplace Cultural Awareness through Short-Term Global Experiences, was a poster presentation at the Southern Nurses Research Society and a published article. Their work demonstrates how short-term global health experiences facilitate the development of nurse’s cultural awareness and are an effective mechanism for enhancing cultural competence for nursing students’ at all academic levels. View the award-winning submission in PDF format

2009 Kindred Spirits Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship

2008 Kindred Spirit Award winner, Caitlyn Mathis Audrey McGraw, RN-BSN Class 2009, received the fifth annual Kindred Spirits Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship for addressing diversity in care through creation of an insightful and original tool to bridge an identified communication gap.

McGraw’s project, entitled SpAN-IT: Spanish-Speaking Audiovisual Tool, is an easy to use, highly accessible, audio-visual tool for use at the patient bedside that provides nurses with simple, audible, volume-controllable, native-Spanish-dictated dialogue to assist in meeting the communication needs of post-operative, intubated, and mechanically-ventilated Spanish-speaking patients, in situations where interpreters are limited and other communication methods are not feasible. This project is for use in the CardioVascular-Thoracic Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CVT-SICU) of First Health Moore Regional Hospital in Pinehurst, N.C.  View the award-winning submission in PDF format

2008 Kindred Spirits Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship

2008 Kindred Spirit Award winner, Caitlyn Mathis Caitlyn Mathis, BSN Class of 2008, received the fourth annual Kindred Spirits Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship for raising awareness in the Latino community regarding the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

Mathis’s project, Protegiendo a Nuestros Niños [Protecting Our Children] is a booklet that was creatively designed, using a culturally-insightful template called the fotonovela. The format resembles a comic book, but uses photographs rather than cartoons. She developed her project for El Centro Hispano and Child Protective Services, in Durham, NC.

View the award-winning submission in PDF format

 

2007 Kindred Spirits Award

Meredith McGee, 2007 Kindred Spirits AwardeeMeredith McGee, BSN Class of 2007, received the third annual Kindred Spirits Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship for examining diversity in care through sensitive, creative and original coursework.

McGee submitted an essay titled “I Don’t Discriminate…Do I?” in which she addressed the open-minded and non-judgmental attitude that nurses need to posses to care for the myriad of patients in the healthcare system. McGee said her goals were to raise awareness among nurses of how their actions affect patients and emphasize fair and compassionate health care.

View the award-winning submission in PDF format

2006 Kindred Spirits Award

2006 Kindred Spirit Award winner, Laura NidayLaura Niday, BSN Class of 2007, recieved the second annual Kindred Spirits Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship. Niday submitted an essay titled “Maternity Care for Limited English Proficiency Patients,” in which she described the experience of caring for a Latino woman, during and after her Cesarean section, who did not speak English. “In the field of obstetrics where support for laboring women and new mothers is vitally important, I believe that having the ability to communicate with Spanish-speaking patients would be of great benefit,” said Niday. “This experience has driven me to continue learning Spanish and to strive toward increasing my cultural competence,” she said.

View the award-winning submission in PDF format

 

2005 Kindred Spirits Award

2005 Kindred Spirit Award winner Christina MartinezBSN student Christina “Kim” Martinez was selected as the first recipient of the Annual Kindred Spirits Award for Excellence in Multicultural Scholarship.

Martinez submitted an abstract which included a comprehensive care plan reflecting on an experience she had providing care for a 47-year-old Mexican man, who recently immigrated to the United States, suffering from acute renal failure.

View the award-winning submission in PDF format