Since 1996, the School of Nursing has been recipient of an Institutional Training Grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (T32NR007091). The focus of the training is the development and testing of theory-based interventions for preventing and managing chronic illness. The most recent competing renewal (07/01/2016-06/30/2021; MPIs: S. Santcroce/J. Leeman).) emphasizes accelerating translation of theory-based interventions into practice using five translation catalysts: stakeholder engagement, patient-centered outcomes, SMART designs and adaptive interventions, mixed-methods, and dissemination and implementation science.

The training grant provides funding for four postdoctoral and seven pre-doctoral trainees per year. School of Nursing faculty and faculty from across campus mentor these trainees by providing research experiences to build the trainees’ skills.  The program’s goal is to prepare nurse scientists to develop and test complex, theory-driven interventions that are scalable and can be translated into clinical practice.  Trainees may focus on either prevention or management of chronic illness in the population, age group, or clinical group of interest to them.

T32 pre-doctoral awards are for one year and are renewable for a total of up to three years based on academic performance and scholarly productivity during the appointment period.  Pre-doctoral trainees will work on their mentor’s funded research projects and develop a portfolio that will include presentations, publications, and individual NRSA applications (F31).  Pre-doctoral trainees must be a United States citizen or permanent resident who has been accepted to or is currently enrolled in the School of Nursing’s PhD Program. Accepted applicants to the PhD program will be considered for the T32 based on the fit between their research interests and the focus of the T32, their academic record, and other aspects of their PhD program application. A separate application is not required.

T32 postdoctoral awards are also for one year and may be renewed for a second year based on scholarly productivity during the appointment period. Postdoctoral trainees work with a faculty mentor and are also expected to produce scholarly work, apply for funding, and actively participate in an interdisciplinary research center relevant to their research.  Additionally, postdoctoral fellows are expected to develop their own project that builds on existing infrastructure and ongoing research projects.

To apply for a postdoctoral traineeship, applications must be a United States citizen or permanent resident with a BSN or MSN, and have fulfilled all the requirements for the PhD in nursing or a related field.

 Apply for the postdoctoral traineeship here.

If you have questions, please contact one of the T32 Directors: Dr. Sheila Santacroce at sheila.santacroce@unc.edu or Dr. Jennifer Leeman at jleeman@email.unc.edu

  • 60% of the tuition charged by the School of Nursing
  • Monthly stipend
  • Fixed amount of funds for research training related expenses including health insurance
  • Individualized research mentoring and career planning
  • Participation in regular research and integrative seminars
  • Methodological consultation including Biobehavioral methods
  • Assistance with grant development and submission
  • Opportunity to work with interdisciplinary research leaders

Current Postdoctoral Trainees

Forgive Avorgbedor PhD, RN received her baccalaureate degree from University of Wisconsin Milwaukee School of Nursing. Her research revolves around pregnancy health, postpartum health, biobehavioral and bio-psycho-social approaches to research and lifestyle, behavioral interventions. Her goal is to improve health quality for women at greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) by designing and implementing interventions to prevent CVD among women diagnosed with hypertension during pregnancy.

Dr. Avorgbedor received her PhD from Duke University school of Nursing in 2017. The title of her dissertation was, “Hypertension in Pregnancy: Effect of Prenatal Care on Maternal and Infant Health”. After receiving her PhD, Dr. Avorgbedor was a co-investigator on a Minority Supplement for a NIH-funded randomized controlled trial (RCT) at Duke University School of Medicine that investigated cardiovascular disease disparities and lifestyle interventions among patients with resistant hypertension.

During her postdoctoral fellowship at UNC, Dr. Avorgbedor will be working with Dr. Yeo on Prenatal Smart Heart Study that seek to promote stretching exercise to reduce cardiovascular health risk in late pregnant women with obesity. She will also receive training on stress measurements in pregnant and postpartum women.

Her mentor is Dr. SeonAe Yeo.

HONORS AND AWARDS

2018 Julian Abele Award, Nursing Student of the Year, Duke University (First person of African descent to obtain PhD from Duke School of Nursing)
2013-2017 Duke University, Graduate School Fellowship
2016 Summer Fellowship, Duke University
2015 Summer Fellowship, Duke University
2014 Summer Fellowship, Duke University
2012 Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society
2012 McNair Fellowship, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI-Infant Mortality Review
2012-2013 SURF-Stipends for Undergraduate Research Fellows, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

 

Publications

Avorgbedor, F., Silva, S., Merwin, E., Blumenthal, J. A., & Holditch-Davis, D. (2019). Health, Physical Growth, and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Preterm Infants of Women with Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, 48(1), 69-77, doi.org/10.1016/j.jogn.2018.10.003

Smith, P. J., Blumenthal, J. A., Hinderliter, A. L., Mabe, S. M., Schwartz, J. E., Avorgbedor, F., & Sherwood, A. (2019). Neurocognition in treatment-resistant hypertension: profile and associations with cardiovascular biomarkers. Journal of Hypertension, 37(5), 1040-1047, 10.1097/HJH.0000000000002002

Presentations

Avorgbedor, F., Hughes, A.H. & Holditch-Davis, D. Parents’ Knowledge and Experiences with Preterm and Full-term Infant Care after Hospital Discharge.  A Literature Review. Sigma Theta Tau International’s 26th International Nursing Research Congress. San Juan, Puerto Rico. July 27, 2015

Avorgbedor, F., Hughes, A.H. & Holditch-Davis, D. Outcomes and Implementation Challenges of the Centering Pregnancy Model of Prenatal Care.  A Literature Review. Conference proceedings of the 29th Annual conference of the southern Nursing

Avorgbedor, F. & Johnson, T. Perception of Positive Interactions with Health Care Providers by women who Experienced Perinatal Loss and their Attempts to Impact their Health. Conference proceedings of 21st Annual National Research Conference & Graduate Fair. Geneva, WI. September 2012.

Avorgbedor, F. & Johnson, Women Who Have Experienced the Loss of An Infant Before or Soon After Birth, and Their Interactions with Caregivers. University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee Open House October 2012. (featured in Milwaukee Courier Weekly Newspaper).

Ahrang Jung received a PhD in nursing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) in 2018 and completed a 1-year postdoctoral fellowship in Cancer Outcomes Research Program at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center before starting her T32 Fellowship at the School of Nursing. She received her BSN and MSN from Seoul National University in South Korea. Dr. Jung worked as an oncology nurse at Asan Medical Center in South Korea for seven years and was selected as one of seven outstanding nurses from among 3,100 nurses for a nursing internship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Jung’s research interests include patient reported outcomes, cancer symptom management, cancer survivorship issues, and nursing interventions for improving the quality of life of cancer survivors. Her doctoral dissertation research utilized a cross-sectional descriptive survey to assess how various bladder cancer treatments, surveillance procedures, patients’ cancer-related uncertainty, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms can affect the quality of life for survivors of bladder cancer.

During her postdoctoral fellowship in Cancer Outcomes Research Program at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Dr. Jung continued studying the experience of bladder cancer populations and extended the study population to the family members and caregivers of the bladder cancer patients.

Her current research projects are focusing on care needs of bladder cancer patients and caregiver experience of their family members. During her T32 postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Jung is receiving comprehensive training to develop theory and evidence-based supportive care interventions to improve quality of life for bladder cancer patients.

Her mentor is Dr. Lixin Song.

SELECTED GRANTS & AWARDS

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship from UNC Graduate School (2016 – 2017)
  • Cancer Outcomes Research Program Research Award from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (2016 – 2017)
  • Linda Waring Matthews Research Fund Scholarship (2016)
  • Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Alpha Chapter Research Grant (2016)
  • Korean Nurses Association President’s Award (2006)

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Ahrang Jung, Matthew Nielsen, Jamie Crandell, Mary Palmer, Sophia Smith, Ashley Bryant, Deborah Mayer (2019). Health-Related Quality of Life among Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study, BJU international. doi: 10.1111/bju.14888

Ahrang Jung, Matthew E. Nielsen, Jamie L. Crandell, Mary H. Palmer, Ashley Leak Bryant, Sophia K. Smith, Deborah K. Mayer (2019). Quality of Life in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review, Cancer Nursing, 42(3), E21-33.

SELECTED PRESENTATIONS

Ahrang Jung, Bogeum Choi, Heejun Kim, Lixin Song. AMIA 2019 Clinical Informatics Conference, Poster presentation, “Care Need Assessment among Patients with Bladder Cancer and Their Family Members Using Social Media,” Atlanta, GA, 2019

Angela Smith, Lixin Song, Ahrang Jung, PEER Members, Jean Hoffman-Censits, Stephanie Chisolm, John Gore. 2019 ONS 44td Annual Congress, Poster presentation, “Evaluation of Burden and Needs Assessment among Bladder Cancer Caregivers,” Anaheim, CA, 2019

Ahrang Jung, Jamie Crandell, Matthew Edward Nielsen, Deborah Mayer. 2019 ONS 44td Annual Congress, Oral presentation, “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Survivors,” Anaheim, CA, 2019 

Ahrang Jung, Matthew Edward Nielsen, Jamie Crandell, Ashley Leak Bryant, Sophia Kustas Smith, Deborah Mayer. 2018 ONS 43rd Annual Congress, Poster presentation, “Quality of life in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors: A systematic review,” Washington, DC, 2018

Ahrang Jung, Jamie Crandell, Matthew Edward Nielsen, Sophia Kustas Smith, Mary Happel Palmer, Ashley Leak Bryant, Deborah Mayer. 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium, Poster presentation, “Predictors of quality of life in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer survivors,” San Diego, CA, 2017

Colleen McGovern, PhD, MPH, RN is a Postdoctoral Fellow with UNC – Chapel Hill School of Nursing (T32NR007091-23). Dr. McGovern completed her PhD in Nursing at The Ohio State University (OSU) in 2018 and a Master of Public Health in 2015.  She also holds bachelor’s degrees in nursing and in elementary education.  Prior to pursuing a PhD, Dr. McGovern worked in critical care and community settings, always with a special interest in health disparities and the needs of underserved populations. Dr. McGovern also has a passion for nursing and teaching.  She completed the Nurse Educator Certificate and has experience teaching implicit bias and pharmacy classes to undergraduate students.

Dr. McGovern’s research focuses on the intersection of chronic physical conditions and mental health in children. Specifically, she is interested in the development and implementation of theory based interventions for children with asthma and anxiety/depressive symptoms to improve physical and mental health outcomes. Learning coping skills alongside self-management behaviors as children may contribute to better overall health during adolescence and adulthood.

Dr. McGovern’s pre-doctoral training at OSU was supported by a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (T32NR014225) and included mentored research experiences in the development and management of behavioral intervention studies, and in conducting focus groups with children and adults.  For her dissertation research, Dr. McGovern adapted a cognitive behavioral skills-building intervention for children with asthma and anxiety, and then conducted a one-arm pilot study of the asthma education and coping skills program delivered in small school-based groups.

During her postdoctoral fellowship at UNC, Dr. McGovern is conducting a randomized pilot study.  She is also gaining skill in using wearable activity and asthma devices to measure intervention processes and outcomes.

Her postdoctoral mentor is Dr. Diane Berry.

Grants

2017 – 2019: American Nurses Foundation/National Association of School Nurses Dissertation Research Grant. McGovern (PI) “COPE for Asthma: A Cognitive Behavior Skills Building Intervention to Improve Physical and Emotional Outcomes” ($4,347)

2017 – 2019: National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners Dissertation Research Grant. McGovern (PI) “COPE for Asthma: A Cognitive Behavior Skills Building Intervention to Improve Physical and Emotional Outcomes” ($2,500)

2017 – 2019: Sigma Theta Tau International/Midwest Nursing Research Grant. McGovern (PI) “COPE for Children with Asthma: A Cognitive Behavior Skills Building Intervention to Improve Physical and Emotional Outcomes” ($2,500)

2017 – 2018: Theta Tau Epsilon grant. McGovern (PI) “COPE for Asthma: A Cognitive Behavior Skills Building Intervention to Improve Physical and Emotional Outcomes” ($500)

2014 – 2017: National Institute of Nursing Research, Institutional Research Training Program (T32NR014225), annual renewal. PIs: Dr. Pamela Salsberry, Dr. Kimberly Arcoleo, Dr. Rita Pickler, & Dr. Bernadette Melnyk

2016: Mary Molina Education Scholarship ($2,500)

2015: Midwest Nursing Research Society Student Research Scholar’s Award ($500)

Publications

Melnyk, B.M., Kelly, S., Stephens, J., Dhakal, K., McGovern, C.M., Tucker, S., … Bird, S.B. (Submitted). Interventions to improve mental health, well-being, physical health and lifestyle behaviors in physicians and nurses: A systematic review. American Journal of Medicine.

Arcoleo, K.J., McGovern, C.M., Kaur, K., Halterman, J.S., Mammen, J., Crean, H., Rastogi, D., Feldman, J.M. (Accepted). Patterns of Mexican and Puerto Rican children’s asthma controller medication adherence over 1 year. Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Arcoleo, K.J., Marsiglia, F., Serebrisky, D., Rodriguez, J., McGovern, C.M., & Feldman, J. (Accepted). Explanatory model for asthma disparities in Latino children: Results from the Latino asthma project. Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

McGovern, C.M., Arcoleo, K., & Melnyk, B. (November 2019). COPE for asthma: Outcomes of a cognitive behavioral intervention for children with asthma and anxiety. School Psychology Quarterly.

McGovern, C.M., Militello, L.K., Arcoleo, K., & Melnyk, B. (2018). Factors associated with healthy lifestyle behaviors in adolescents. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 32(5), 473 – 480.

Bates, R. A., Blair, L. M., McGovern, C. M., Schlegel, E. C., Nist, M. D., Sealschott, S., & Arcoleo, K. (2018). Nursing across the lifespan: Implications of Lifecourse Theory for nursing research. Journal of Pediatric Health Care32(1), 92-97.

Kelly, S., Stephens, J., Hoying, J., McGovern, C.M., Melnyk, B. M., & Militello, L. (2017). A systematic review of mediators of physical activity, nutrition, and screen time in adolescents: Implications for future research and clinical practice. Nursing Outlook65(5), 530-548.

McGovern, C. M., Redmond, M., Arcoleo, K., & Stukus, D. R. (2017). A missed primary care appointment correlates with a subsequent emergency department visit among children with asthma. Journal of Asthma, 1-6. DOI: 10.1080/02770903.2017.1283697 PMID: 28635549

Melnyk, B., Slevin, C., Militello, L., Hoying, J., Teall, A., McGovern, C. (2015). Physical Health, Lifestyle Beliefs and Behaviors, and Mental Health of Entering Graduate Health Professional Students: Evidence to Support Screening and Early Intervention. Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, 28(4), 204-211.

Presentations

McGovern, C.M., Arcoleo, K.J., & Melnyk, B.M. (November 2019). Longitudinal results from a school-based intervention pilot study for children with asthma and anxiety. American Public Health Association; Philadelphia, PA (National; Poster).

Arcoleo, K.J., Marsiglia, F., Serebrisky, D., Rodriguez, J., McGovern, C.M., & Feldman, J. (November 2019). Differences in prevalence, disclosure, predictors and patterns of use of complementary & alternative medicine (CAM) between Mexican and Puerto Rican Children with asthma. American Public Health Association; Philadelphia, PA (National; Podium/Oral).

Arcoleo, K.J., McGovern, C.M., Kaur, K., Halterman, J.S., Mammen, J., Crean, H., … & Feldman, J.M. (October 2019). Concurrent patterns of children’s controller medication adherence and quick relief medication use and relationship to acute healthcare utilization. International Society for the Advancement of Respiratory Psychophysiology, Veyvey, Switzerland (International; Podium/Oral).

Hutson, E., McGovern, C.M., & Melnyk, B.M., (2019). Best practices for study design in pediatric intervention research: Group vs. individual, child vs. adolescent, school vs. clinic settings. National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (National; Poster).

McGovern, C.M. (2019; local, invited). Results from dissertation presented to the Columbus City School Nurses; presentation also had a focus on “creating voice” among nurses in the school setting.

McGovern, C.M., Militello, L.K., Arcoleo, K.A., & Melnyk, B. (2018). Children living with asthma and anxiety/depression: A systematic review with clinical practice and research implications. Midwest Nursing Research Society (Regional; Poster).

Arcoleo, K., McGovern, C.M., Kaur, K., Halterman, J., Mammen, J., Crean, H., & Feldman, J. (2017). Patterns of children’s controller medication adherence over 1 Year: Do we need to re-think our approach? International Society for the Advancement of Respiratory Psychophysiology, Lille, France (International; Podium/Oral).

Arcoleo, K., McGovern, C.M., & Feldman, J. (2017). Integrative, complementary, and traditional health practices among Latino children with asthma and influence on asthma control. American Public Health Association; Atlanta, Georgia (National; Podium/Oral).

McGovern, C.M., Arcoleo, K., & Feldman, J. (2016). A new paradigm for addressing asthma controller medication adherence. Abstract selected for poster presentation at the American Public Health Association conference in Denver, Colorado (National; Poster).

McGovern, C.M., Arcoleo, K., Militello, L.K., & Melnyk, B. (2016). An explanatory model for factors influencing healthy lifestyle behaviors in adolescents. Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science (National; Podium/Oral).

McGovern, C.M., Redmond, M., Arcoleo, K., Stukus, D. (2016). Are missed primary care appointments related to emergency department visits among children with asthma? 7th Annual Pediatric Asthma Conference, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio (Regional; Poster).

Melnyk, B.M., Hoying, J., Slevin, C., & McGovern, C.M. (2015). An innovative wellness onboarding program for health sciences students: Baseline findings with implications for practice and future research. Symposium at the 26th International Nursing Research Congress for Sigma Theta Tau International in Puerto Rico (International; Oral).

McGovern, C.M., Melnyk, B.M., & Arcoleo, K. (2015). Correlates among disruptive behavior, mental health, substance use, and healthy behaviors in Hispanic/Latino High School Adolescents. Oral presentation/PPT at the 26th International Nursing Research Congress for Sigma Theta Tau International in Puerto Rico

McGovern, C.M., Melnyk, B.M., Kelly, S.A., & Militello, L.K. (2015). Correlates among disruptive behavior, mental health, substance use, and healthy behaviors in Hispanic/Latino High School Adolescents. Poster presented at the annual Midwest Nursing Research Society in Indianapolis, Indiana (Regional; Poster).

Dr. Grace Wu received her PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) School of Nursing in 2018. She earned her BSN at Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology and her MSN at Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan. Prior to pursuing her PhD degree, Dr. Wu worked as a registered nurse for twelve years and a lecturer in evidence-based practice for seven years in Taiwan.

While earning her PhD, Dr. Wu worked as a teaching and research assistant, a graduate student recruiter, and a clinical compliance specialist at the UNC School of Nursing. Dr. Wu was awarded a Summer Research Fellowship, a Dissertation Completion Fellowship, and the Virginia J. Neelon Endowed Bio-Behavioral Nursing Scholarship by the UNC School of Nursing and Graduate School. She also received a Future Faculty Fellowship Program certificate from the UNC Center for Faculty Excellence. She has published six papers as a first author and has delivered ten research presentations at scientific conferences around the world.

Dr. Wu’s research interests are the stress associated with weight stigma and eating disorders. In her PhD research, she studied hair cortisol as a biomarker of chronic stress to investigate the link between the stress of weight stigma and the biological stress response of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity at UNC Biobehavioral Laboratory. She also focused on the behavioral stress response by examining the association between the weight stigma and binge eating behaviors. Dr. Wu’s postdoctoral research focuses on biological predictors of eating disorders with a specialization in roles of stress and appetite hormones in the mechanisms of eating disorders. She is currently examining whether the changes in cortisol, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and ghrelin during inpatient treatment of women with anorexia nervosa predicts their relapses and disordered eating symptoms at 3-months post discharge at the UNC Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders (CEED). Dr. Wu is also receiving comprehensive training in eating disorders at the UNC CEED and is learning how to develop interventions at the UNC School of Nursing’s T32 grant. Her goal is to pursue a tenured faculty position at a research-intensive university to contribute to the prevention of eating disorders.

HONORS AND AWARDS (In U.S.)

2016-2017 The Virginia J. Neelon Endowed Bio-Behavioral Nursing Scholarship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.
2016 Certificate of the Future Faculty Fellowship Program from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for Faculty Excellence.
2015-current Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing Membership.
2015-2016 Joanne Sandergaard Scholarship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.
2015-2016 PhD Program Scholar Award from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.
2014-2015 Graduate Tuition Incentive Scholarship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School.
2014-2015 Brummett-Kemble Scholarship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.
2014-2015 Elizabeth Scott Carrington Scholarship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.
2013-2014 Blackwell Graduate Scholarship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.

 

GRANTS

Principal Investigator. Weight stigma and acculturation in relation to hair cortisol and binge eating in overweight and obese Asian-Americans. Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School, 8/22/2017-5/8/2018.

Principal Investigator. Weight stigma in relation to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, binge eating, and acculturation among overweight and obese Asian-Americans. Graduate Student Transportation Grant from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School, Spring 2018.

Principal Investigator. Weight stigma and acculturation in relation to hair cortisol and binge eating in overweight and obese Asian-Americans. Summer Research Fellowship from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School, Summer 2016.

Principal Investigator. Use of online chat room for a hybrid format research course in a nursing graduate program. PhD Program Scholar Award from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, April, 2016.

PRESENTATIONS

Wu, Y. K., Zimmer, C., Munn-Chernoff, M. A., & Baker, J. H. (2019, September . Body dissatisfaction and food addiction among college students: mediating role of eating expectancies. Poster presented at Eating Disorders Research Society Conference, Chicago, Illinois.

Wu, Y. K., Baker, J., & Berry, D.C., (2019, March). Weight stigma, binge eating, and acculturation among Asian Americans with overweight and obesity. Poster presented at the International Conference on Eating Disorders, New York, NY.

Caughey, M.C., Cho, J.S., Wu, Y.K., Nix, B.W., & Yeo, S. (2018, March). Feasibility of stretching exercise for prevention of late-onset preeclampsia: A pilot trial. Poster presented at the EPI/Lifestyle 2018 Scientific Sessions, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Wu, Y. K., Berry, D., Schwartz, T., Leeman, J., Hodges, E., & Richman, L. (2018, February). Weight stigma in relation to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, binge eating, and acculturation among overweight and obese Asian-Americans. Oral present at 21st Annual American Association of Behavioral and Social Sciences Conference, Las Vegas, NV.

Wu, Y. K., & Berry, D. (2016, July). Weight stigma in relation to hair cortisol and binge eating in obese Asian- Americans. Poster presented at Sigma Theta Tau International’s 27th International Nursing Research Congress, Cape Town, South Africa.

Wu, Y. K., & Yeo, S. (2016, April). Use of online chat room for a hybrid format research course in nursing graduate program. Poster presented at the STTI/NLN Nursing Education Research Conference, Washington, DC

Wu, Y. K., & Estrem, H. (2016, May). An unexpected journey: Managing care for young children with feeding problems. Poster presentation at the XX Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, New Orleans, LA.

Wu, Y. K., & Chu, N.F. (2016, February). BMI, Body Fat Mass and Plasma Leptin Level in Adolescents: Relationship with Cardiovascular Diseases Risk Factors. Poster presented at the 30th Annual Conference of the Southern Nursing Research Society, Williamsburg, Virginia.

Wu, Y. K., & Berry, D. (2015, February). The impact of weight-related stigmatization on physiological and psychological health outcomes for overweight and obese individuals. Poster presented at the 29th Annual Conference of the Southern Nursing Research Society, Tampa, FL.

Wu, Y. K., & Liu, Y. (2013, May) Explore weight stigmatizing experience level in overweight adults in southern Taiwan. Poster presented at the 25th Quadrennial Congress of the International Council of Nursing (ICN), Melbourne, Australia.

Wu, Y. K., & Liu, Y. (2013, April) Explore the level of binge eating and related factors among

overweight adults in southern Taiwan. Poster presented at Sigma Theta Tau International’s 24th International Nursing Research Congress Prague, Czech Republic.

Wu, Y. K., Tsai, C.E., & Tai, H.P. (2010, December). Evaluation of the prevention of peripheral intravenous therapy-related phlebitis with liver cirrhosis patients at a medical center. Poster presented at International Conference on Ethics and Professionalism, Selangor, Malaysia.

PUBLICATIONS

Wu, Y.K., Berry, D.C., Schwartz, T. (2019). Weight stigma and acculturation in relation to hair cortisol among Asian Americans with overweight and obesity: A cross-sectional study. Health Psychology Open, 1-13. doi:10.1177/20551029198292

Wu, Y.K., & Berry, D.C. (2017). Impact of weight stigma on physiological and psychological health outcomes for overweight and obese adults: A systematic review. Journal of Advanced Nursing. accepted on Nov. 1, 2017. doi: 10.1111/jan.13511

Wu, Y. K., & Chu, N. F. (2015). Introduction of the transtheoretical model and organizational development theory in weight management: A narrative review. Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 9(3), 203-213. doi: 10.1016/j.orcp.2014.12.003

Wu, Y. K., Chu, N.F., Huang, Y.H., Syu, J.T., Chang, J.B. (2015). BMI, body fat mass and plasma leptin level in relation to cardiovascular diseases risk factors among adolescents in Taitung. Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 10(4), 432-441. doi: 10.1016/j.orcp.2015.08. 009

Wu, Y. K., & Liu, Y. (2015). Weight-related stigmatization and binge eating among overweight adults in southern Taiwan. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition,24(1),118-127. doi: 10.6133/apjcn. 2015. 24.1.05

Wu, Y. K., Lin, C.C. (2011). Lifestyle changes: Effects on an obese patient. The Journal of Nursing, 58 (4), 99-105.

Wu, Y. K., Tsai, F.M., & Lin, C.C. (2011). Effectiveness of the self-regulation protocol on physical and psychosocial functions in patients with chronic illness: A systematic review. Journal of Nursing and Healthcare Research, 7(1), 26-34.

Questions?

Contact Program Directors Dr. Sheila Santacroce or Dr. Jennifer Leeman.