Group photo of the fall 2022 School of Nursing Alumni Association in front of an entrance to Carrington Hall.

SONAA Board of Directors

We are pleased to introduce you to the four new School of Nursing Alumni Association Board of Directors who look forward to serving our Carolina Nursing Alumni Community!

Please click their names below to learn more.

New Members

Cheryl Brewer, PhD ’11   +

Cheryl Brewer is the Associate Vice President of Nursing for the Duke Health Integrated Practice of Duke Health. She also serves as Clinical Associate Adjunct Faculty at Duke University School of Nursing. In her role she provides oversight for the practice and professional development of nurses across 120+ clinics and is a nurse scientist whose research includes strategies to improve quality of life & decrease stigma in individuals with sickle cell disease. She is a member of several professional organizations including the International Association of Sickle Cell Nurses & Professional Associates, the American Organization for Nursing Leadership, NC Nurses Association, National Black Nurses Association Sickle Cell Disease Committee, Central Carolina Black Nurses Council and the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing. She is also the proud recipient of several awards including: the UNC Chapel Hill School of Nursing Outstanding Alumni Service award, Duke University School of Nursing Distinguished Alumna, & the NC Central University Nursing Distinguished Alumna. Cheryl received her BSN Degree in Nursing from NC Central University, a MSN Degree in Nursing Administration from Duke University and a PhD in Nursing from UNC-Chapel Hill. 

Why are you proud to be a Carolina Nurse? 

I am extremely grateful and proud to be a Carolina nurse as I continue to benefit from the rigorous education, training and skills received during my tenure. This has prepared me to make valuable nursing contributions regarding high quality and compassionate patient care, research and leadership. I am also now part of a community and network of UNC nursing alumni who provide support & opportunities for professional growth, advocacy, and lifelong learning. 

Best advice I have ever been given: 

The best advice I have ever been given is that one does not have to be in a leadership position to be a leader. As nurses, we are expected to lead. 

My proudest accomplishment: 

My proudest accomplishment to date was leading the launch and formal establishment of the COVID-19 Nurse Triage Center during the COVID pandemic. This endeavor resonates because it was nurse-driven and encompassed many of the concepts, and skills that we learn throughout our education. It provided an opportunity to work collaboratively with professionals, engage with staff and patients while moving through a framework of change, crisis leadership, resilience and innovation. 

Nancy Crutchfield, BSN ’67   +

Nancy Crutchfield graduated with a BSN in 1967 and an MPH in 2000 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has had a varied career in wellness, Hospice, medical/surgical unit and community college freshmen student instructor. She completed her nursing career as a school nurse, a position she held for 22 years. She has served more than nine years on the National Board for Certification of School Nurses. She has also served on her local Board of Health for 9+ years, with some of those years as chairman. 

Best advice I have ever been given: 

I had the admissions director at a 3-year nursing program tell me to get a BSN degree at a 4-year college rather than to attend their 3-year program. She said if I had trouble, to come back to her and she would take me. I have frequently thought about how her future thinking saved my life. 

How has your Carolina Nursing education impacted your life and career? 

My BSN degree made it easier to pursue my MPH later in my career. The MPH at Chapel Hill was at first not a nursing master’s and then the administrators decided to offer the nurses an NLN-accredited Master’s degree if we focused our degree on Nursing. 

My proudest accomplishment: 

I was selected by my peers as NC School Nurse of the Year for 2006. 

Amanda Greer, BSN ’01   +

I graduated from UNC School of Nursing in 2001 and from the VCU nurse anesthesia program in 2009. I currently work as a CRNA in multiple locations in the triangle as an independent contractor. In my spare time, I love spending time with my two boys, husband, and dog. We love to be active, especially in outdoor activities. 

Why are you proud to be a Carolina Nurse? 

UNC is a great university and the UNC SON has always been a top-notch program. I will always be proud to be associated with such an amazing program. 

Best advice I have ever been given: 

To take pride in one’s own work and work hard no matter what the job. 

How has your Carolina Nursing education impacted your life and career? 

It has provided me with amazing opportunities in nursing and in advancing my career. The education I was provided at UNC has prepared me for all the work I have done in nursing. 

Caroline Kraft, BSN ‘14, MSN ’18, DNP ‘20  +

Caroline Kraft, DNP, MA, PMHNP-BC, PMHS completed a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from State University of New York (SUNY) Albany and a master’s degree in Organizational Psychology from Columbia University.  In 2012, she went to UNC-Chapel Hill to obtain a bachelor’s degree in Nursing, a Master’s degree in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing (PMHNP), and a Doctorate Nurse Practitioner degree in Advanced Practice Nursing. Dr. Kraft has cared for children, adolescents, and adult patients in a variety of settings including the emergency room, inpatient, and outpatient practices. She is the Director of Nursing at Carolina Behavioral Care, an outpatient mental health clinic in the Triangle area.  In this role, she splits her time between working clinically with patients and Quality Assurance projects to improve patient care and support organizational goals. Dr. Kraft also works as needed in the Emergency Room (Psychiatric Emergency Services team) at UNC Healthcare. Dr. Kraft is a Clinical Assistant Professor at UNC-Chapel Hill School of Nursing teaching graduate Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner students and undergraduate students in psychiatric diagnosis and psychopharmacology. She has precepted graduate and undergraduate students in a variety of clinical settings. Dr. Kraft is certified as a Pediatric Mental Health Specialist (PMHS) through the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board.  

Why are you proud to be a Carolina Nurse? 

As a Carolina nurse, I have the profound opportunity to serve my community by engaging collaboratively in challenging and rewarding work that I hope makes an impact. 

Best advice I have ever been given: 

Follow the 70/30 rule for success. Just showing up ready to participate in a positive way takes care of 70 percent. The 30 percent comes from your unique contribution, curiosity, tenacity, and drive.  

How has your Carolina Nursing education impacted your life and career? 

Fulfilling my dream of becoming a Psychiatric Mental-Health Nurse Practitioner was possible because of the education and training I received at UNC Chapel Hill. I can’t think of a better place to learn, grow, and develop. I enjoy giving back to the school by teaching future nurses and PMHNPs. I can never leave! 

Our Board of Directors 2023-2024

Mary Chandler, BSN ’83, Chair +

Mary is a Carolina nurse who is “Tar Heel born and bred” but spent 34 of her 35 years working as a nurse outside of North Carolina. Mary’s career was surgery focused and she retired in 2018 after 15 years as an FNP solely in Hand Surgery where she worked in the UVA Department of Plastic Surgery. Though she went to UVA for graduate school to get my MSN, she shares that the UNC School of Nursing set the foundation for her continued professional growth. She now resides in Chapel Hill and loves staying involved with the

School and serving on the School of Nursing Alumni Association board.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
I am proud to be a Carolina Nurse as the reputation of our program and our fellow alumni have impacted patient care and the health of populations nationally. Employers are aware of the strength of our degrees.  My practice was strong from the start and continued to grow throughout my 35-year career.

What is your favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing?
As a member of the Alumni Association board, I am fortunate to interact with the SON administration, faculty, alumni and current students. From this vantage point, I have the opportunity to hear first hand what is going on within the school and with nursing practice throughout the world among our alumni. I am humbled by our collective achievement. I am honored to say we are connected together through this outstanding university.

Best advice I have ever been given:
As a new graduate nurse working in my first job, an older, experienced diploma program nurse had this to say to me as we gathered meds for our patients’ morning doses:  I can work faster than you and you are half my age. I can do everything you can do more efficiently. But you can outthink me. You make care decisions based on evidence practice. You see the bigger picture. Her words stuck with me as I pursued graduate degrees in nursing always recognizing being a leader.

Schquthia Peacock, BSN ’92, MSN ’99, Vice Chair +

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Schquthia has been in private practice as a Family Nurse Practitioner at a primary care practice that she co-owns since 1999. She worked as a Registered Nurse at Durham Regional Hospital and a Clinical Instructor at Watts School of Nursing before she returned to UNC for a Master’s Degree in Advance Practice Nursing. Schquthia remains involved with the School of Nursing by serving as an Adjunct Clinical Faculty for the MSN/DNP program. She was selected as a Fellow for the American Nurses Association Nurses Advocacy Institute from 2015 to 2016. She has served on the North Carolina Nurses Association Council Executive Board since 2012 and is currently the chair of the North Carolina Nurses Association Council of Nurse Practitioners (NCNA NP), a role she has held since 2016. In 2014, the NCNA recognized her as the Practice Nurse of the Year, and in 2017 the NCNA awarded her with the Legislative Nurse of the Year Award. In 2020, she was chosen as the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners Advocate State Award for Excellence for North Carolina.

What is your favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing?
I’ve enjoyed reconnecting with the School of Nursing since graduation and helping move the School toward its vision. My favorite part has been my involvement with mentoring students.

Best advice I have ever been given:
Lean into your fear! You may surprise yourself with what you can accomplish!

My proudest accomplishment:
Celebrating 20 years of practice ownership as a Nurse Practitioner in April 2020.

If I had a superpower it would be:
Listening with a non-judging ear!

Lesley Forde Cogburn, BSN ’87, Immediate Past Chair +

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Lesley received her BSN from UNC School of Nursing in 1987 and her MSN in 1992 from Georgia State University. She started her nursing career at Egleston Children’s Hospital in Atlanta, GA and has been a pediatric nurse practitioner at Dekalb Pediatric Center in Decatur, GA for 27 years. No two days are alike in pediatric primary care and she feels fortunate to have built lifelong relationships with patients and families. Outside of her work, she enjoys medical mission work abroad and her family enjoys hiking and camping as often as possible. Lesley says, “I am proud to be a Carolina Nurse because it represents someone who was taught quality, patient-centered care. Serving on the Alumni Association board has made me so proud of the work the faculty, students, and alumni are doing to meet the changing needs of patients and our profession.”

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
I am proud to be a Carolina Nurse because although the role of a nurse has changed over the years, Carolina Nurses have always been well-educated and prepared to contribute. We leave the UNC School Of Nursing ready to make a difference.

What is your favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing?
Being asked to serve on the Alumni Board came after a time of feeling disconnected from the School of Nursing. I am now amazed at the curriculum, research and service the students at all levels are doing. I am excited to play a role in encouraging other alumni to reconnect to what they love and are proud of as a Carolina Nurse.

Best advice I have ever been given:
A mentor of mine lives by example of the quote by Mother Teresa “We cannot all do great things, but we can do small things with great love.”

My proudest accomplishment:
My career as a pediatric nurse practitioner for 25 years at the same practice. I have been a consistent part of so many families watching them “grow up” through happy times and stressful illness. Many have gone into nursing or brought their babies back to see me!

If I had a superpower it would be:
If I had a superpower, it would be to fly allowing me to connect with friends and family in many places. At work, I wish my superpower was X-ray vision to see inside patients to help make them better.

Louise Fleming, PhD ’16, Faculty Representative +

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Dr. Fleming has been a registered nurse since 1998, and completed her Master’s of Science in Nursing Education from Duke University and her PhD in Nursing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has worked in the hospital setting in critical care and emergency medicine. Dr. Fleming has done research at both Duke University and UNC’s schools of nursing concerning parental management of adrenal crisis in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). She serves as the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs, teaches in the undergraduate and graduate programs and continues her program of research examining the intersection of family life and CAH. Her work has been featured in numerous peer-reviewed academic journals, and she speaks both nationally and internationally on family management of CAH. She is also developing new models for the undergraduate capstone clinical experience with community partners. She serves on the Board of Trustees and is the Vice Chair of the CARES Foundation.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
The growth the faculty and students have given me over the last 14 years.

What is your favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing?
Witnessing the dedication of our Alums to our current students.

Best advice I have ever been given:
There is such a thing as sacred idleness.

How has your Carolina Nursing education impacted your life and career?
I couldn’t possibly answer this completely in so few words. In a nutshell- I feel at home at Carolina.

My proudest accomplishment:
Completing my PhD while working full time and raising 3 kids.

If I had a superpower it would be:
Twinkle my nose and have full cooked meals in my house and in others’ homes.

Landy Fox, BSN ’56, Alumna Emerita +

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Landon “Landy” Lewis Fox is a graduate of Carolina Nursing’s second class in 1956. She is a retired registered nurse who worked in pediatrics and she and her husband Tom have three daughters. Landy is the 2022 recipient of the Carolina Nursing Alumni Lifetime Achievement Award. Landy and her husband Tom have established two scholarships at the School of Nursing. In 2010 they established the J. Thomas Fox & Landon Fox Undergraduate Nursing Merit Scholarship Fund and in 2015 they established the School’s first DNP scholarship, the Thomas and Landon Fox Graduate Pediatric Nursing Scholarship Fund. Together these two scholarships have provided multi-year support for more than a dozen students.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
Because of the excellent reputation, our school has achieved since its’ foundation seventy years ago under the guidance and vision of Dean Elizabeth L. Kemble.

What is your favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing?
It is to be associated with a very capable and inspiring group of our Carolina graduates whose goal is to support its’ alumni by maintaining strong connections and loyalty to their School of Nursing.

If I had a superpower it would be:
To discover the necessary funds immediately available for a new Carrington Hall, no strings attached and built to last into the future!!

Kelli Gaskill, BSN ’14, MSN ’20, Member +

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Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Mindpath Health

 

Kelli Gaskill is a Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner with MindPath Care Centers and provides in-person and telehealth psychiatric medication management and psychotherapy to adolescent and adult patients ages 12 and up. Previously, she worked as an oncology nurse. She first practiced general oncology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and more recently worked as a CNII on the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at UNC Hospitals. She is a second-career nurse, entering the clinical world following a 15-year career in public relations. She holds a BA in Journalism and Mass Communication from UNC. She is a graduate of UNC’s ABSN and MSN programs. She shares her home with her dog, Maisy, and her cats, Andrew and Luna.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
As a Carolina nurse, I am part of a strong tradition of nurse leaders who are helping to shape the field as we adjust to a new normal in today’s challenging health care setting.

Best advice I have ever been given:
I’ve received many words of wisdom over the years, but one piece of advice that has served me well in my career and in my personal life is to “meet people where they are.” Not everyone has the same privileges or life experiences, but each person’s experience is valuable and to help them, you have to attempt to view the world from their perspective, not just your own.

How has your Carolina Nursing education impacted your life and career?
I had some personal struggles during both my undergrad and graduate nursing careers, and the faculty and staff in the UNC School of Nursing provided me with support that allowed me to build my confidence and achieve my goals to become first a nurse and then a nurse practitioner.

My proudest accomplishment:
I don‘t have just one, because they were all equally important to me, for different reasons: Getting accepted to UNC three times over, and then graduating with each of those three degrees.

If I had a superpower, it would be:
To instill kindness and empathy in each person who lacks it.

Dedrick Hines, ABSN ’17 +

Dedrick Hines is an ABSN Class of 2017 graduate of the UNC School of Nursing. He works as a travel nurse for AYA Healthcare working mainly with med surge and telemetry units and occasional shifts at the ED and ICU at smaller hospitals in North and South Carolina. In the future, he is looking to apply to the DNP program and focus on community and preventive health care.

Outside of work, Dedrick is a husband and father to what he describes as “the sweetest and a bit sour two-year-old.” He established the organization Foundation, which was founded on the idea of people coming together and using their gifts to help others. This organization has provided several scholarships, back-to-school giveaways, and various other fundraisers to uplift the community. You can learn more about his work with Foundation in this School of Nursing article. Dedrick also works as a real estate investor in the Raleigh, Durham and Rocky Mount areas.

Crystal Kelly, BSN ’87, MSN ’91, Member +

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As a nurse practitioner for three decades, Crystal has had career practice experience in the areas of Psychiatric-Mental Health, Women’s Health and Family Medicine. She works for a field-based extension of the Medical Affairs department for a biopharmaceutical company, where she leads a team of dynamic NPs and PAs. Her team bridges the gap between medical science and research through education and scientific exchange with other APPs (NP, PA, CNS) and nurses in the therapeutic area of movement disorders. To advance her desire for interdisciplinary professional collaboration to improve patient care outcomes, Crystal recently completed a Doctor of Health Sciences (DHS) degree from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS) with a concentration in Educational Leadership and was promoted to Associate Director, Field Medical Affairs at Neurocrine Biosciences. Crystal feels honored to serve on the UNC School of Nursing Alumni Association Board of Directors. She is the proud mom of two young adult men, wife to Mike, and enjoys their life on Lake Norman.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
Serving on the Alumni Association Board feels like I’m coming HOME! I have so many fond memories of my days as a Carolina student but as we all know, if you were a nursing student, your longest and most intensive days were spent in the halls of Carrington. As an undergraduate nursing student, I took an active role in our professional organizations and greatly enjoyed the networking and rich relationships that developed. I fully expected I would stay intimately connected to the SON and its mission; however, other life priorities kept me from actively “giving back” to the SON until now. I am excited for the opportunity to come “home” to work with other proud UNC-SON alumni!

My proudest accomplishment:
Seeing my children grow up into awesome young men!

If I had a superpower, it would be:
To have “eyes like an eagle.” The world in sight would be laser focused and brilliantly colored. As I have gotten older and my eyes no longer see at 20/20, I long even more for super-human vision. But beyond the advantage of enhanced physical sight, my ideal super-power vision would allow me to “see” situations with greater clarity. It would allow me to “see” the super-powers of others (family, friends, colleagues) to help them positively leverage their individual superpowers in their own lives. Plus, having eyes like an eagle would enable me to see a caterpillar crawling on the sidewalk from a 10-foot building and to make out the expressions of our beloved UNC athletes from the stands. That sounds pretty cool to me!

Annette Ivey Peery, BSN ’83, Member +

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Annette Ivey Peery is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the East Carolina University College of Nursing. In this role, she oversees the curriculum of all academic programs in the College of Nursing, which has over 1,300 enrolled students. She began her career working in Intensive and Cardiac Care Units before transitioning to Home Health Nursing. While working in that field, she acted as the supervisor at the home health agency. For the past 30+ years, she has been employed in nursing education, starting with an associate degree program before moving to East Carolina University. At ECU, she has taught BSN, Alternate Entry MSN, and MSN students and serves on PhD dissertation committees. She has served in various administrative roles over the years, including Department Chair and Associate Dean of the undergraduate program, before moving into the role of Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. She received her BSN (’83) from UNC-Chapel Hill, her MSN from ECU, and her EdD from NCSU. Annette lives in Greenville, NC, with her yellow lab “Buddy”. She has two sons, Roger and Ben (BA 2014).

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
As I think back over my career, I know that my time at Carolina and in the School of Nursing prepared me to be the best nurse possible and to take on challenges that I never anticipated. Carolina nurses continue to be exceptional and practice across the globe impacting healthcare, policies, laws and regulations to improve access to care and health of individuals, families and populations. I am forever proud and grateful to be a Carolina nurse!

Favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing?
Serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing will allow me to better reconnect with the School of Nursing and alumni. I am excited to learn more about what’s going on in the School of Nursing, its programs and outreach. Nursing education is constantly changing!

Best advice I have ever been given:
The best advice I have ever been given, or maybe it was just role modeled for me, is to always be open to new opportunities, even if you weren’t looking for them. I never imagined being an Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, but as administrative opportunities arose in my career, I accepted them, learned from them and found that I enjoyed each and every one.

Gwen D. Sherwood, MSN ’70 +

Gwen D. Sherwood, PhD, RN, FAAN, is a Professor Emeritus and was the Associate Dean for Academic

Affairs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing. Her program of scholarship evolved from a model for caring relationships which led to the examination of patient satisfaction with pain management, particularly from a multicultural perspective and the development of a Spanish Language tool, the Houston Pain Outcome Instrument. She also applied the caring model to spiritual dimensions of care and the impact on healthy work environments and helped develop the Methodist Caring Tool to examine patient satisfaction with caring. At the University of Texas at Houston School of Nursing, she was a co-investigator with the Medical School’s Center for Patient Safety to examine teamwork as a variable in patient safety.

Dr. Sherwood is a co-investigator on Phases I, II, III, and IV of the award-winning Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to transform nursing curriculum to prepare nurses in quality and safety for redesigned health care systems. She was a nursing leader for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University Inter-professional Patient Safety Education Collaborative to measure the effectiveness of teaching modalities for interdisciplinary teamwork training involving nursing and medical students. She participates in the annual Telluride Science Institute on interprofessional education with the University of Illinois at Chicago and is a member of the National Patient Safety Foundation Research Committee. She has been a leader in developing nursing education across borders, working with nursing faculty in China, Thailand, Macau, Mexico, England and Kenya.

She is the Past President of the International Association for Human Caring and served two terms as Vice President of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society for Nursing. She recently published the third edition of Quality and Safety in Nursing: A competency approach to improving outcomes also translated into four languages. She is Visiting Professor for Hong Kong University, visiting faculty for Taipei’s National Defense University, and Fulbright Specialist in South Africa.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina Nurse?

UNC has always had a sterling reputation in nursing. In studying for my MSN (’70), we had access to national leaders who shared their knowledge and inspirations with us. I was inspired to continually seek lifelong learning and development and always push for nursing advancements. Returning to Carolina in a faculty role provided unique opportunities to build on the legacy of so many who invested in making Carolina First in Nursing

Favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board?
I want to help others cherish the experience of a Carolina education for the potential to make a difference in nursing by improving patient care outcomes. Serving is an opportunity to share not just my story, but to collate other stories to share with alums, potential students, and the public. It is a way to share the image of what nursing truly is. I want to insure others have opportunities to continue their professional development through resources we can provide.

How has your Carolina Nursing education impacted your life and career?
It has opened doors, and always been a point of pride to say I am an alum.

Alyshia Wood Smith, BSN ’89 +

With more than 30 years of leadership experience, Dr. Alyshia Smith joined the Durham VA Health Care System (DVAHCS) in 2022 as the Executive Director/CEO. Employing more than 3600 employees, she has the direct responsibility for a nearly $1.1 billion operating budget and a full array of clinical care and services that span over 12 sites and 27 counties. Prior to joining DVAHCS, Dr. Smith was the Phoenix VA Health Care System (PVAHCS) Medical Center Director. She began at the PVAHCS in September 2015 as the Associate Director for Patient Care Services (ADPCS) and Nurse Executive. She was the longest-serving Phoenix VA executive leader, possessing a deep understanding of VA culture, strong community relationships, and clinical expertise. Dr. Smith began her VA career as the Deputy Chief Nurse at the Washington DC VA Medical Center in 2010, where she was responsible for nursing operations. She led the implementation of a hospital-wide cardiac monitoring system, facilitated the opening of the Emergency Department (ED) Overflow Unit and ED Fast Track Area, a newly constructed inpatient unit and short-stay unit. Prior to coming to the VA, she worked in a large, complex hospital in the private sector where she held roles as Registered Nurse, Nurse Manager and Senior Nursing Director for Medical-Surgical Services and later for Professional Practice.

Dr. Smith earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a Master of Science and Doctor of Nursing Practice from the University of Maryland, and a Post Masters Certificate in Business and Health Care from Johns Hopkins University. She has served as clinical faculty with nursing programs at Georgetown University and the University of Maryland and is board certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as a Nurse Executive, Advanced. She is a member of the American Organization of Nurse Leaders and the American College of Healthcare Executives.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina Nurse?

The program has a strong reputation as one of the best in the country.  The UNC SON reputation and ongoing contributions of the faculty and students make me proud.

My proudest accomplishment

It is hard to narrow down to one thing; however, leading a healthcare organization, in an area hit hard during COVID-19 was humbling and transformational.  I was so proud to be a healthcare executive and even prouder to be a nurse.  I witnessed incredible sacrifice and empathy as healthcare workers left their families to care for patients, hold their hands and provide comfort and reassurance during a very frightening time, for everyone.

Angela Brice-Smith, BSN ’79, Member +

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Nursing Public Administrator, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Department of Health and Human Services (Retired)

 

Angela Brice-Smith recently retired from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (formerly known as the Health Care Financing Administration) after more than 30 years of public service. Before entering senior management, Angela used her clinical expertise to solve issues in Medicare managed care plans, Medicare fee-for-service plans, Medicaid plans and later in the Affordable Care Act. Most of her responsibilities were related to regulatory compliance and improving health care quality. In addition, Ms. Brice-Smith was the Agency Chief Negotiator for the negotiation of the Master Labor Agreement, serving 6,000+ employees. She received her Masters’s in Public Administration from Virginia Commonwealth University Angela lives in West Friendship, MD, but can often be found walking in the woods in Goochland, VA where she is growing loblolly pines for timber and toilet paper on her paternal family farm. Her son, Walter, lives in Charlotte, NC.

Why are you proud to be a Carolina nurse?
I’m proud to be a Carolina nurse because the program was tough, challenging, and reputable.

Favorite part about serving on the Alumni Association Board for the School of Nursing?
I look forward to serving on the Alumni Association Board for the SON to support and truly look FORWARD to support nursing careers, opportunities in various, shifting settings.

Best advice I have ever been given:
Never give up! — on your dreams, especially the aspects YOU, yourself control.

My proudest accomplishment:
There are so many that touch on survey and certification of a number of facility types that span issues from restraint use, transplants, provision of services, to actions to stop or suspend Medicare payments for poor/absent care. The more recent outreach activities involving the new Medicare cards and ensuring access for many Americans & Native Americans to the Affordable Care Act health insurance, especially in the southern States where I had responsibility.

If I had a superpower, it would be:
My super power would be listening, then taking action to seek common ground to leverage health care improvements or accomplishments.

Student Representatives

LAUREN AYCOCK, BSN ’23, Chair, SON Undergraduate Student

VINISHA DSOUZA, MSN, RN, PhD ’24, SON Doctoral Student Organization

ROB WUTHENOW, RN, MSN ’24


If you are interested in serving on the School of Nursing Alumni Association Board of Directors or learning more about alumni events and activities, please contact Deanna Wilkie, Director of Alumni and Donor Relations at (919) 966-1412 or dwilkie@unc.edu.